Author Topic: Multiple allergen recipes? and a dip recipe from me.  (Read 259 times)

ebrochu

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Multiple allergen recipes? and a dip recipe from me.
« on: January 02, 2019, 02:40:26 pm »
I have a thread up in off topic - hugs please about my allergens, and I'm looking for recipes!

Allergens include: Wheat flour, oats, salmon (and all fresh water fish, incl. catfish, carp, trout, bass, perch, etc) peppers (incl. bell peppers, all spicy peppers, capsicum, paprika, and black pepper as well) eggplant, tomatoes, chocolate, cola, cocoa.

I'm currently eating plain foods (eg. chicken thigh in butter with salt) plain rice noodles (with butter, or a light cheese sauce) It's cheese melted down, not a roux. I love garlic and onions, and cook with them as well, to season whatever meats i'm eating.

I love all veggies not on the list, and I eat those as well, whether raw or cooked. I LOVE salad, and have gotten used to vinagrette dressing. I have my own standby recipe for a cobbled together salad ( coleslaw mix, sauteed mushrooms, corn and dressing of choice)

It's not that I can't find the foods to eat, it's HOW to cook them. I went looking for sauces to marinate foods in, and virtually all have either eggs, or tomato in them. I've found one honey garlic sauce I can have, but it's not compatible with everything. I can definitely add herbs to foods, and I will be, but sometimes you just want something different, you know?

And eggs. I loved eggs. I don't need a recipe for egg substitute for baking, cause I'm allergic to wheat flours as well, so I haven't had anything baked since May 2018. But they seem to be the basis for every healthy food dish out there. That, and tomatoes. I mean, I love avocado, but I can't have the egg on top, nor the toast. And eating a half avocado on it's own is yummy, but...weird looking. :)

I agree that gluten free is an option for bread substitute, and I'll be checking out the options near me. I've tried the staple breads we sell in our department, and they're not great, so I'll be checking out other options further afield. Right now, i'm getting what little carbs I eat from either plain white rice, or rice pasta.

If anyone has any recipes for ANYTHING that doesn't have the allergens on the list, I'd appreciate it so much. Or any tips of any kind, really. It's been overwhelming being on this side of the allergen issue. My family has been awesome in helping and supporting me, and I love them for it, but it's been a struggle finding what to eat.




For the chip dip, I mix together 2 tubs of cream cheese, and 1 tub of sour cream. A layer of cooked ground beef (or turkey, or chicken, or pulled pork, it's all good!  (about 1/2 pound) seasoned to your own tastes (I just put in dried onion powder and garlic powder) I sautee some portabella mushrooms ( i use the large ones, and chop them down...about 4 to 5 of them.) in butter, drain, and layer onto the mix. Then I put on half to a full avocado, mashed and spread on as the next layer in the dip. I then add the layer of cheese to finish it off. I will nuke it to help melt the cheese, but beyond that, it's done. It serves about 8 people, and I've kept it in the fridge for about a week before it starts seperating.

If you can use it, you can mix in some taco seasoning into the cream cheese mix, as well as the ground beef. I have to leave the cream cheese layer plain, and cook some onion and garlic into the beef. (I've just used dried of these, haven't tried the real thing yet) And if you want to use the pulled pork, there are some premade that don't have any sauce, but are seasoned. If you make your own, then if you use it, I'd suggest not having too much sauce in it, otherwise it'll get really goopy. And you can layer in some peppers as well, which ones are dependent on your spice tolerance. I leave that layer out, of course.

Hope you enjoy!

Serve with any dippable you like. I use veggies (celery, carrots) and corn chips.

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STiG

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Re: Multiple allergen recipes? and a dip recipe from me.
« Reply #1 on: January 02, 2019, 05:11:08 pm »
No advice on the recipes but for carbs/dippers, I'd look into gluten free crackers.  There are many of them that are really tasty and not noticeably gluten free, unlike many of the breads.  I get a couple of different varieties at Costco.

Consider getting a bread machine, maybe even from the thrift store.  A coworker makes gluten free bread in the machine - small loaves frequently because the bread isn't bad right fresh but after a while, it's not great and it's better to toast it at that point.
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QueenFaninCA

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Re: Multiple allergen recipes? and a dip recipe from me.
« Reply #2 on: January 02, 2019, 05:24:52 pm »
Some ideas in random order:

Sauce for your chicken breast: Pan-fry your chicken in butter or your preferred oil. When done, remove chicken and add some liquid (broth, wine, fruit juice, anything that goes flavor-wise with the chicken). Dissolve any brown bits from the pan in there. Make a slurry from corn starch and water. Add slurry to pan, boil until thickened.

Roast or grill your chicken after rubbing it with herbs/spices/mustard/...

Half beer, half soy sauce makes an awesome marinade for grilled tri-tip (and would likely work for chicken, too).

Fingerling potatoes: Season with salt and whatever other spices or herbs work with the other dishes. Drizzle with olive oil. Bake at 350F dor 35 minutes.

A lot of Asian dishes should work for you as the starch is usually rice. Just stir-fry some mix of meat and veggies, add some liquid, perhaps a bit of cornstarch and serve over rice.

Smash up several cloves of garlic with some salt. Stir in plenty of olive oil. Drizzle over steamed brokoli or sliced-lengthwise, grilled zucchinis (while veggies are still hot). Marinate overnight in the fridge. Serve cold.

Season mashed potatoes with nutmeg instead of pepper. And of course make them from scratch with whole milk and a bit of butter.

Lots of fun things you can do with a pork tenderloin.

If you don't own a lot of cookbooks or cooking magazines, I'd get a bunch from the library for inspiration. There is really a lot you can make with those restrictions. It doesn't have to be bland and boring.

And there are a lot of non-boring recipes that are still pretty easy and fast to fix, so you can stay away from prepared foods that contain offending allergies. It just requires some planning like looking up recipes in advance and adding the required ingredients to your grocery shopping list.

VorFemme

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Re: Multiple allergen recipes? and a dip recipe from me.
« Reply #3 on: January 02, 2019, 05:31:55 pm »
Somewhere in my old Betty Crocker (? or was it Better Home & Gardens?) cook book is a tarragon chicken breast recipe - there are other spices, but have you thought about sorting through your herbs & spices shelves to remove the allergens and then running a search online for recipes that include the remaining herbs & spices?  There was another that was an Island-style Chicken that was baked in orange juice with a bit of something else...I guess I need to go look at the cook book in the morning.

Can you have cinnamon?  I seem to remember a baked cinnamon chicken recipe being a plot point on Little House On The Prairie - but have no idea what it might have tasted like...other than don't keep adding more cinnamon as it bakes, cinnamon can get quite spicy on the tongue! 

Chez Miriam

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Re: Multiple allergen recipes? and a dip recipe from me.
« Reply #4 on: January 02, 2019, 05:50:25 pm »
Do you like houmous?  I keep threatening to make some from scratch, but haven't yet got around to it.  It's a yummy addition to a salad, and works on rice crackers, with avocado slices, too.

In the UK, we're not unused to having a half avocado served with a salad and vinaigrette dressing in the hollow of the avocado - would something like that appeal?

A restaurant favourite is pumpkin/butternut squash risotto - basically pre-cooked squash added to a risotto last minute to warm through.

Please don't underestimate the power of fresh herbs to change the character of a dish/add flavour.

A small amount of sherry/vermouth/port/red wine, etc, can really enhance any kind of stew; we do "rice and bean" which is basically wholegrain rice and a tin of kidney bean with whatever we fancy added [for us: tinned tomatoes, tomato puree, but a bouillon would be equally as nice] - leftover veg always add to the dish.

{{Hugs}}, and nudges for other inspiration! ;)
"All shall be well, and all shall be well, and all manner of thing shall be well."  - Julian of Norwich
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Hanna

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Re: Multiple allergen recipes? and a dip recipe from me.
« Reply #5 on: January 02, 2019, 05:52:06 pm »
Farro salad:
Cook Farro using package instructions and let cool, then mix in olive oil and lemon. Add arugula or spinach, pine nuts, sliced black olives and feta cheese. Salt to taste.  (You can use all kinds of alternative ingredients with this)

We use cucumbers as an alternative to crackers when serving cheese and crackers.

Try spaghetti squash with homemade pesto or just butter and cheese if you need a “pasta” fix. (Storebought pesto is probably loaded with pepper)

Brine your chicken a few hours and it will be so yummy even without marinating. Olive oil, lemon and wine makes a nice simple marinade, too. I recently read to cook chicken at a high temp for less time and it comes up very tender this way. 450 for 20 minutes depending on thickness.

Green beans blanched then sautéed with ginger are excellent! No pepper needed.

Try Horseradish or wasabi in mashed potatoes instead of pepper. This is a good alternative to butter, too.  I also use the water the potatoes are cooked in instead of milk and they come out very tasty that way.

My aunt is also allergic to most of the things you mentioned: all nightshades, flour, etc.  She won’t go out to eat many places, particularly because of the pepper.  But she has been happy with Macaroni grill and their attention to details with allergy requests.
« Last Edit: January 02, 2019, 06:03:36 pm by Hanna »
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Dazi

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Re: Multiple allergen recipes? and a dip recipe from me.
« Reply #6 on: January 02, 2019, 05:52:42 pm »
****Reminder soy sauce is not wheat free unless it's specifically stated it's gluten free****

I like to do a baked chicken that is covered in olive oil, rosemary, thyme, garlic, and lemon zest (sage is optional). I stuff the bird cavity with an onion and the lemon.

Then in the same pan or a separate one, with the same seasonings, I chop up rather chunky, red potatoes, carrots, and parsnips.  This works for turkey, and I'm told also for pork.

Rice and beans

Soups... Get creative with the spices. You can toss in any vegetables you want, with any meat you want, add rice or gf pasta. * If you add GF pasta, do NOT ADD it to the pot. Cook it separately and add it to each serving as you eat it.




Chez Miriam

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Re: Multiple allergen recipes? and a dip recipe from me.
« Reply #7 on: January 02, 2019, 05:58:36 pm »
If you can find halloumi [Cypriot cheese], this is fantastic fried and added to hot or cold dishes; really chewy, textured and flavoursome.

In the past, I've made my favourite sandwiches using Romaine lettuce leaves instead of a wrap/bread: not ideal maybe, but perfectly nice.

I think someone mentioned quinoa?  If that's OK, it's worth persevering with [my husband hated it, but has come around; I loved it, which is probably why our household gave it multiple second chances? ;)].
"All shall be well, and all shall be well, and all manner of thing shall be well."  - Julian of Norwich

Dazi

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Re: Multiple allergen recipes? and a dip recipe from me.
« Reply #8 on: January 02, 2019, 06:04:25 pm »
If you can find halloumi [Cypriot cheese], this is fantastic fried and added to hot or cold dishes; really chewy, textured and flavoursome.

In the past, I've made my favourite sandwiches using Romaine lettuce leaves instead of a wrap/bread: not ideal maybe, but perfectly nice.

I think someone mentioned quinoa?  If that's OK, it's worth persevering with [my husband hated it, but has come around; I loved it, which is probably why our household gave it multiple second chances? ;)].

OT, but just a very weird fun factoid regarding quinoa....

So, as I'm sure most of y'all know I have Celiac disease and a ton of food allergies. Quinoa is often used as a GF substitute. I thought I was revolting. Tried it again and it was even worse. Third time broke out all over.

I happen to have a terrible allergy to beets and Swiss chard. As it turns out, quinoa is in the same family as beets. Who knew?
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Chez Miriam

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Re: Multiple allergen recipes? and a dip recipe from me.
« Reply #9 on: January 02, 2019, 06:27:21 pm »
If you can find halloumi [Cypriot cheese], this is fantastic fried and added to hot or cold dishes; really chewy, textured and flavoursome.

In the past, I've made my favourite sandwiches using Romaine lettuce leaves instead of a wrap/bread: not ideal maybe, but perfectly nice.

I think someone mentioned quinoa?  If that's OK, it's worth persevering with [my husband hated it, but has come around; I loved it, which is probably why our household gave it multiple second chances? ;)].

OT, but just a very weird fun factoid regarding quinoa....

So, as I'm sure most of y'all know I have Celiac disease and a ton of food allergies. Quinoa is often used as a GF substitute. I thought I was revolting. Tried it again and it was even worse. Third time broke out all over.

I happen to have a terrible allergy to beets and Swiss chard. As it turns out, quinoa is in the same family as beets. Who knew?

I had no idea!  Thanks for posting that, Dazi; we have various friends/family members with intolerances/allergies, and I hadn't a clue about that.
"All shall be well, and all shall be well, and all manner of thing shall be well."  - Julian of Norwich

Dazi

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If you can find halloumi [Cypriot cheese], this is fantastic fried and added to hot or cold dishes; really chewy, textured and flavoursome.

In the past, I've made my favourite sandwiches using Romaine lettuce leaves instead of a wrap/bread: not ideal maybe, but perfectly nice.

I think someone mentioned quinoa?  If that's OK, it's worth persevering with [my husband hated it, but has come around; I loved it, which is probably why our household gave it multiple second chances? ;)].

OT, but just a very weird fun factoid regarding quinoa....

So, as I'm sure most of y'all know I have Celiac disease and a ton of food allergies. Quinoa is often used as a GF substitute. I thought I was revolting. Tried it again and it was even worse. Third time broke out all over.

I happen to have a terrible allergy to beets and Swiss chard. As it turns out, quinoa is in the same family as beets. Who knew?

I had no idea!  Thanks for posting that, Dazi; we have various friends/family members with intolerances/allergies, and I hadn't a clue about that.

It's a WEIRD one for sure! I had no idea. It was maybe a year or two later when I found out.

Hanna

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The quinoa reminds me of another salad:

Quinoa, cooked and cooled
Mix in:
Lemon juice and sesame oil (or olive oil)
Cumin and salt
Raw Kale chopped and hard stems removed
Chickpeas
Walnuts pieces
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Hanna

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Found some interesting info for two pepper alternatives, papaya seeds and also something called grains of paradise from the ginger family. (These are at the bottom, the top of the page is about other types of peppercorns which will not work)
https://www.spiceography.com/black-pepper-substitute/
« Last Edit: January 02, 2019, 08:47:12 pm by Hanna »
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Hanna

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And another quinoa idea I have on hand: this had pepper but I took it out and am sure it will be great without it:

Zesty Quinoa Salad served over Spinach with Lemon Sauce
1 Tbsp Extra Virgin Olive Oil
1⁄2 Medium Red Onion, fined chopped 2 Tbsp garlic, minced
1⁄2 cup Sun Dried Tomatoes, chopped 1 cup Vegetable broth
2 Tbsp Lemon Juice
1 cup dry organic Quinoa Grain
1⁄2 tsp sea salt
1 cup broccoli florets in bite size pieces 1⁄2 cup sliced almonds
2 scallions thinly sliced

Directions:
Heat the olive oil over medium heat in a saucepan and sauté the onion and garlic for 3 minutes. Add the sun dried tomatoes, vegetable broth and lemon juice and bring to a boil. Stir in quinoa and salt. Reduce heat and simmer covered about 15 to 20 minutes. Add the broccoli on top and simmer an additional 5 minutes.
Remove from heat, toss gently until combined. Add ground pepper and additional salt, if desired, to taste. Garnish with almonds and scallions before serving over spinach. Dress with Lemon Sauce.
Lemon Sauce
2 lemons, squeezed (about 1⁄2 cup) 1 1⁄2 t dried basil
3⁄4 c grape seed oil
3⁄4 c evoo (extra virgin olive oil) 1 t sea salt
1 garlic clove, minced
Combine all ingredients and whisk vigorously. Sauce will slightly thicken. Store in an air-tight container.
« Last Edit: January 17, 2019, 05:41:52 pm by Hanna »
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frog24

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If corn and dairy are still on the menu, take a look for recipes for polenta (corn meal mash).  Some include cheese into the mix while it's hot, others are strictly corn meal, water and salt. 

We had it all the time when I was a kid; either as a side dish to something meaty, or as a meal on its own covered in melted butter and grated feta cheese. 

Bonus points: if there's any left over, put it in the fridge overnight, and the next day you can fry it up like corn chips.