Author Topic: Is One Plan Really More "Fair" Than the Other?  (Read 1788 times)

kckgirl

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Re: Is One Plan Really More "Fair" Than the Other?
« Reply #15 on: February 09, 2020, 05:11:11 pm »
One possible compromise:

- 1 Super Awesome Prize that every teen has an equal chance at
- 7 Moderately Big Prizes, one per branch
- a few Small But Nice Prizes at each larger branch (not needed at the tiny ones as their odds of Moderately Big Prize are so much better)

That could be done at the same budget as 7 Super Awesome Prizes, depending on what they all are.


If I had a vote, this would be my choice.
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bopper

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Re: Is One Plan Really More "Fair" Than the Other?
« Reply #16 on: February 10, 2020, 10:35:59 am »


The cool thing would be to pick the smallest library (let's say Library A=500 kids; Library B=1,000; Library C=2,300) and come up with a Decent Prize that you can do multiples of, and then you have one prize for every 500 kids in each library, rounding off (Library a = 1 prize; Library B=2 prizes; Library C=5 prizes).

Then every kid has a roughly even chance, but the kids in the smaller neighborhoods are less likely to think, "Oh, we're outnumbered by all those wealthier suburban neighborhoods, so I'll never win."


This is the fairest method...but can you explain it well?

Another way is let us say you have 7 branches but then have 10 prizes...each branch gets 1 prize, but then the remaining top page readers (no matter the branch) get the rest of the prizes.

lowspark

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Re: Is One Plan Really More "Fair" Than the Other?
« Reply #17 on: February 10, 2020, 11:13:12 am »
"Fair" is hugely overrated.

Go with the plan that gets the kids to read the most books. That's the goal. Stick with it.

This part really bugs me:
And it is very annoying when prizes for other age groups are going to be drawn locally.  Only the teens and adults are getting this kind of treatment.
The library system should be running all the programs similarly.

I really like the idea of smaller prizes per number of books read. This is how the library used to do it when my kids were young. Having a sure reward based on the number of books you read is a whole lot better than some pie in the sky prize you might win if you're super lucky. Why bother?

And yes, solicit local businesses for donations. They don't have to be super expensive. Then you splash the logos of the businesses who donate on the flyer or website in return for them agreeing to supply the prize to all the kids who meet the goal(s).

I'd still say that per branch is the best way to go, considering the kids in the underprivileged areas are the ones who need the most encouragement to read, and therefore, should be incentivized more aggressively.

If the librarians can tell those kids with certainty that someone from their branch, i.e., their neighborhood, is guaranteed to win a prize, that sounds a whole lot better than being up against all the kids in the city. By the time they're teenagers, these underprivileged kids already have it figured out that life isn't fair and is skewed against them. No wonder so many lost interest when there was only one big prize.
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jpcher

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Re: Is One Plan Really More "Fair" Than the Other?
« Reply #18 on: February 17, 2020, 04:29:06 pm »
OP -- any updates? Curious as to what decision was made?

ZekailleTasker

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Re: Is One Plan Really More "Fair" Than the Other?
« Reply #19 on: March 04, 2020, 10:37:24 pm »
No updates really.  Things have been put off.  But the fairness thing is driving folks crazy.  I have heard that the latest bone of contention is over the hiring of performers.  Time was, three or more programs were selected (magician, story teller, artist, etc.) and each library branch would choose a time for that performer to come to their branch. 

Well, now that 2 small branches chose the same very popular magician (or clown or whatever) the plaint is "You know, we only have so much money and Really Popular Magician has never been to Bigger Branch.  I think Magician should go to bigger branch this year and you small branches hire someone else."

I suspect everyone will be happy when the Summer Reading is over for the year.
"Imagine," drawled Alyce "being so bored you seek boredom to complain about how boring the experience is.  If Ennui and Emo had a baby and allowed it to be raised by Indifference, THAT would be our Flora."  Mallory Jean Hardcastle "The Cautious Density of Flora"
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Kimpossible

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Re: Is One Plan Really More "Fair" Than the Other?
« Reply #20 on: March 05, 2020, 07:34:38 am »
I wonder if the popular entertainer would give a discount for multiple engagements?
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ZekailleTasker

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Re: Is One Plan Really More "Fair" Than the Other?
« Reply #21 on: March 09, 2020, 01:36:29 pm »
That WAS mentioned.  The plaint is that all branches should have all different performers.  Suddenly breaking with the tried and true is a good thing!
"Imagine," drawled Alyce "being so bored you seek boredom to complain about how boring the experience is.  If Ennui and Emo had a baby and allowed it to be raised by Indifference, THAT would be our Flora."  Mallory Jean Hardcastle "The Cautious Density of Flora"
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Chez Miriam

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Re: Is One Plan Really More "Fair" Than the Other?
« Reply #22 on: April 23, 2020, 08:36:42 am »
It's so sad, that libraries are engaged in this sort of 'mine,mine,mine' attitude.

I think what's "fair", and what's "right" are two different things...

Is it fair that children from a more disadvantaged neighbourhood grow up in homes that may have no books at all, and no person to read to them as little'uns because PrimaryCarer is working three jobs to put food on the table and sneakers on feet?

Is it fair that children from more affluent communities probably have more books in their homes than they ever will read, and a mass of people reading to them, tutoring them, helping them...?

Talking about "fairness" in those instances is like comparing apples and oranges: both are what they are, and cannot be otherwise.

I'm guessing AffluentLibrary has more books, and a greater choice of books?  Is that fair?  Yes, and no: yes, because more children, no, because fewer resources are directed towards an area where reading might not be seen as much in daily life, or as easy to achieve.

I think what's "right" is that all children are encouraged to read, and if that means a slight skewing of resources away from areas that are wealthy enough to help themselves towards areas that cannot, well so be it.

My analogy would be: targetting children who live in an area where schools don't have endless playing fields - we all want children to run around, get fresh air, take exercise; sometimes that means resources go to hiring a basketball court/paying for swimming pool time for a school that doesn't have it's own courts/pools.  Is it fair?  Possibly not, if you count every cent.  Is it right?  You bet - all kids need mental and physical exercise/stimulation.

I hope someone higher up the food chain manages to clunk a few heads together before next Summer Reading, ZekailleTasker. :'(
"All shall be well, and all shall be well, and all manner of thing shall be well."  - Julian of Norwich
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lakey

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Re: Is One Plan Really More "Fair" Than the Other?
« Reply #23 on: April 23, 2020, 10:40:40 am »
ChezMiriam, I agree with all of what you said. The only difference is that in my area, the main library with the most resources is actually in a lower income area. It also seems that the big city library and also the branch in a low income neighborhood have considerably higher usage than the branches in more prosperous suburbs. I'm sure it's because of need.

That being said, if the goal is to get kids who don't normally read much to read more, rather than to give out prizes, they need to focus less on statistical fairness.
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Chez Miriam

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Re: Is One Plan Really More "Fair" Than the Other?
« Reply #24 on: April 23, 2020, 10:43:37 am »
ChezMiriam, I agree with all of what you said. The only difference is that in my area, the main library with the most resources is actually in a lower income area. It also seems that the big city library and also the branch in a low income neighborhood have considerably higher usage than the branches in more prosperous suburbs. I'm sure it's because of need.

That being said, if the goal is to get kids who don't normally read much to read more, rather than to give out prizes, they need to focus less on statistical fairness.

Oh, I was misunderstanding - I'd thought the big library was in a more well-off area. :-[ :-[

I totally agree with the bolded; it all depends on what they want.  Statistical fairness is a great way of putting it.
"All shall be well, and all shall be well, and all manner of thing shall be well."  - Julian of Norwich
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